Spring is in the Air!

April 2, 2015

Spring is in the air! Actually, in Portland, it has been for some time. The first sign for me is always the exquisitely fragrant daphne. Now the cherry trees are blossoming and raining down their petals when the wind and actual raindrops blow through. Daffodils, tulips, and hyacinth have started spreading their color and joy around too.This reminds me of last spring’s newsletter, where I talked about the origins of the Enlightened Philanthropy logo. The quatrefoil symbolizes cherry blossoms in Chinese culture and also new beginnings. And here I am, at a new beginning once again, setting down roots in Portland.Thanks to those of you who I’ve met in recent months who are excited about the talents and possibilities I bring back to the area. I look forward to working with you in the months and years ahead. And I look forward to meeting other colleagues as well. Please feel free to share this newsletter.And, thanks to my colleagues around the country who are open to collaboration. It is a pleasure to work with you and think about how we can bring the message of Enlightened Philanthropy to a wider audience. You can read more below.Sending you all wishes for a bright, shiny new beginning this spring!

Deborah Goldstein

831-402-1724

www.enlightenedphilanthropy.com

facebook.com/enlightenedphilanthropy

@dagphilanthropy

Purposeful Planning Institute Annual Rendezvous

We’re a few months into the year and I’m already looking forward to the Annual Rendezvous in Colorado, hosted by the Purposeful Planning Institute, this August. Maybe that’s because I’ve just learned that my colleague, Justin Miller of BNY Mellon in San Francisco, and I will be presenting together on Family Philanthropy: What Works and What Doesn’t.

I hope you’ll join us at this “premier event that offers one-of-a-kind learning and networking opportunities.” This year’s Rendezvous “will bring together over 200 individuals representing more than 20 disciplines and professions for two days of collaborative dialogue, keynotes, and breakout sessions centered on best practices for legacy families and families in business. The theme for this year’s event is The Journey to Mastery and throughout the event we will address the importance of the beginner’s mind and allowing yourself to be open to continual learning and growth in the ongoing journey to mastery.”

Since my first time at the Rendezvous two years ago, I’ve been impressed by the quality of attendees, wealth of networking opportunities, fabulous keynote speakers, and interactive nature of the breakout sessions. I hope to see you there!

Want to Share the Experience of Philanthropy Camp for Women?

In the spirit of collaboration, I’ve been talking with my fellow 21/64 trainer, Emily Davis of Emily Davis Consulting, about bringing Philanthropy Camp for Women to the Boulder, Colorado area. Stay tuned for more information as that develops.

Meanwhile, if you’re an advisor looking for an immersive, experiential philanthropy program for your clients or an individual looking to engage a group of friends in a fun exploration of giving back, let’s talk. I’d be more than happy to bring Philanthropy Camp for Women to your town!

If you’d like to hear more about the experience, listen to this Purposeful Planning Institute call I did last year.

Spreading the Message that We All Can Be Philanthropists!

Thank you to my colleague, Peter Johnson of PWJohnson Wealth Management, who I met at the Rendezvous, for the opportunity to speak to an intimate gathering of clients at a private home in Palo Alto last November. It was my pleasure to inspire these individuals to first think of themselves as philanthropists and then explore their values in more depth in order to inform their giving. Rex Northen of Cleantech Open and Wanda Whitehead of Casa di Mir Montessori School also shared stories of their nonprofit work.

If you missed the live event, the follow up webinar in December was recorded and available to listen to here.

 

 

Looking for a Few Young Philanthropists

Last year I launched New Voices of Philanthropy, featuring amazing young givers, on the Enlightened Philanthropy Blog. Since then I have had the pleasure of interviewing numerous thoughtful, dedicated, generous young individuals. I’m in search of more philanthropists (college age or younger) who are making a difference in the world. If you know someone I should interview, please let me know. I’d love to share his or her story of giving.

If you’d like to receive these blog posts and others in your inbox, sign up here.

 

Resource Highlight—Learning to Give

As you know, I’m keenly interested in how we teach the next generation about giving. How can we instill a culture of philanthropy in the youngest among us? It may happen at home, in the classroom, in a youth group setting, or an afterschool club. Whether you’re a parent, grandparent, aunt, uncle, cousin, or caring adult, we each can play a role in teaching children how to give back.

To help in that effort, check out Learning to Give. This site is based on the vision that “All youth are educated and equipped for lifelong engagement in philanthropy as givers of time, talent, and treasure for the common good.” They have resources for teachers, parents, students, youth workers, faith groups, and independent schools.

This spring, take time to talk with a young person in your life about what giving means to you and ask how you can support them in giving back.


{ 1 comment… read it below or add one }

Katiane February 29, 2016 at 11:21 PM

This made my morning! It’s the first I heard of text giinvg, and I find the idea tremendously exciting. I think that a lot of potential donors around my age (mid-twenties) and younger will really appreciate the option.If an organization doesn’t accept online donations, they most likely will not see my money. It’s mostly because I simply won’t remember to find my checkbook and a stamp.But it’s also partly because I barely remember the days before you could order and pay for products over the internet. Not accepting online payments/donations just seems completely backwards. Why would I trust an organization like that to make progress and change in the world?

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